South American Influenced Country Kitchen

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South American Influenced Country Kitchen 2017-01-27T00:16:08+00:00

Project Description

Goodwin Residence (SFR)
South American Influenced Country Kitchen
1998 | University City

Kitchen

  • Redesigned a New Country Kitchen and Breakfast Area
  • Added a Dutch Door and New Flooring to the Entry
  • Replaced Existing Window With New Maestro Bay Window
  • Lowered Window Sill so Countertop will Run into Bay Window Projection
  • Raised Header on Pass Through Opening to Match Other Door & Window Heights
  • Removed Flagstone Face from the Fireplace and Replaced with Combination of Drywall, Marble, and New Mantels
  • Updated the Powder Room in Same Style as Kitchen
  • New Mexican Paver Flooring Run thru the Entire Area Worked

Kitchen Details

Fixtures

  • Cabinets: Mission White Raised Panel Thermofoil Doors and Parts
  • Cabinet Interior: White Melamine
  • Cabinet Lighting: NuTone 318 18″ Fluorescent Under Cabinet Lights
  • Countertops: 6″ x 6″ Rustic Blue Ceramic Tiles with No Drip V-Cap Edge
  • Backsplash: Same 6″ x 6″ Blue Tiles
  • Sink: Stainless Steel Undermount Sink
  • Faucet: Single Lever Euro Style Main Faucet and Separate Water Filter Faucet to its Right, Water Filter Under Sink Also Feeds the Water and Ice in Refrigerator
  • Window: Maestro 72″ x 50″ P.G. Bay Window with Side Casements
  • Room Lighting: Halo Halogen Ceiling Recessed Cans with White Baffled Trim on Dimmer Switches, Placed over Work Areas and Cabinets

Appliances

  • Refrigerator: GE TFX 25PR4 Free Standing Refrigerator, Cabinet Door Profiles Added with Trim Kit from Appliance Mfg.
  • Cooktop: Thermador GPS36GLS 36″ 4 Burner Plus High Btu Commercial Look Cooktop
  • Oven: Existing White Single Wall Oven below Microwave
  • Range Hood: Thermador Down Vent Behind Cooktop
  • Microwave: Existing White Built-in Microwave above Single Oven
  • Dishwasher: Existing, White

Materials

  • Flooring: Stained and Finished 12″ x 12″ Mexican Paver Tiles

Powder Room

  • New Cabinets, Counters, Flooring to Match Kitchen

Powder Room Details

Fixtures

  • Cabinets: Classic White Raised Panel Thermofoil Doors and Parts
  • Cabinet Interior: White Melamine
  • Cabinet Lighting: Fluorescent Under Cabinet Lights
  • Countertops: 6″ x 6″ Rustic Blue Ceramic Tiles with No Drip V-cap Edge
  • Backsplash: Same 6″ x 6″ Blue Tiles
  • Sink: Undermount Blue and White Ceramic Sink
  • Faucet: Wide Spread Country Style Faucet
  • Room Lighting: Recessed Halogen Ceiling Cans on Dimmer Switches and Placed over Work Areas and Cabinets

Materials

  • Flooring: Stained and Finished 12″ x 12″ Mexican Paver Tiles

Project Credits

Designer: Danilo Nesovic
Contractor: Danilo Nesovic
Interior Decoration: Homeowner Knew the Look and Materials They Wanted
Cabinet Manufacturer: Danilo Nesovic

Project Overview

This was the first of 4 significant remodels we did for this work-at-home client. He is a consultant that travels the world for his profession, and this kitchen and adjoining rooms project reflects a strong South American influence that reflects their style tastes. It has the classic white cabinets and bluish counters of a Country French kitchen, with the South American influence of stained and finished Mexican paver floors throughout the remodeled area.

The kitchen was completely reworked. The main work areas — sink, cook top and refrigerator — are well placed with good counter and storage space available. A second work area was created next to the ovens by adding a prep sink and appliance garage that houses the coffee maker, as well as a pass-through to the formal dining area when entertaining. The breakfast nook and adjoining closet with bi-fold doors offers additional pantry like storage, and we also added an additional work/display/storage area.

Like the majority of my clients who originally requested this white painted look, as you will see in my portfolio, when I showed them samples of white raised panel thermofoil doors and explained how easy they are to keep clean, how they last many years longer than a painted door, and how much less expensive they are, they selected the thermofoil. Unlike most other kitchen fabricators, I do not limit the molding options for a thermofoil cabinet project like this to only thermofoil light valence or crown moldings, since they are very limited in size, shape, and color. When I say these doors look like painted doors, I am not exaggerating. What I have always done with solid color thermofoil’s like this is offer all the same molding that we use on real wood projects, and simply paint the wood to match the thermofoil. This has always given my thermofoil projects much greater depth and detail than other manufactures, who do not seem as capable of thinking outside the box and mixing materials to create unique and stunning detailed overall looks that can be shaped to any style, by the use of appropriate detailed moldings. Classic, Mission, Craftsmen, Art Deco, and most other styles are not defined as much by the actual door style used as they are by the choice of how to accent the doors with accompanying crown, casing, or light valence molding that create the overall style.

A larger bay window was added over the sink area to add dimensionality and more natural light, as did the coffered ceiling we added to the middle of the kitchen and the crown molding we extended over the entire breakfast room ceiling.

Notice the placement of the Halogen recessed down lights over the countertops as you look around the kitchen, they are not in the typical brain-dead architectural geometric pattern seen in most magazines. These kitchen lights are placed where they are needed over work spaces, in front of cabinets so the cabinets are highlighted and you are not standing and working in your own shadow like you would if the lights were behind you in a geometric pattern in the ceiling. We also supplemented the lighting with under cabinet florescent lights.

In the entry we had a custom made Dutch Door made by a regional fabricator that really redefined the entryway. The upper part of this door is left open most summer days, keeping the dogs in but allowing the ocean breeze to sweep through the house.

The dining room and living room were originally separated by an old very rustic flagstone covered facing and hearth that spanned the entire wall on both sides. That flagstone and hearths were removed, and the client chose the more elegant and traditional look of simple marble around the mouth of the fireplace and no hearth; since the new tile floors are non-flammable, a raised hearth was no longer needed. This hearth removal added over 16″ of floor space to both rooms when done, making them both feel and function much larger than before.

The only thing needed today to bring this entire living space up to today’s standards would be to replace the ceiling halogen cans and florescent under cabinet lights with LED versions.